MiniMeanderings
dirtyriver:

atompunk:

klappersacks:

(via File Photo) on Flickr.

"Those Beatnicks! Living in Hobo love!"

"Dealing in startling crime!"

My god, my mother was “hunting for strange kicks!”  I bet she was breeding Bolsheviks in her bathroom, too.

dirtyriver:

atompunk:

klappersacks:

(via File Photo) on Flickr.

"Those Beatnicks! Living in Hobo love!"

"Dealing in startling crime!"

My god, my mother was “hunting for strange kicks!” 

I bet she was breeding Bolsheviks in her bathroom, too.

peashooter85:

Horrible Histories —- Stalingrad

If you’re unfamiliar with “Horrible Histories” it is often pretty horrible, but it’s also pretty awesome.

beatonna:

hadrian6:

Hercules at the Feet of Omphale. 1912. Gustave Claude Etienne Courtois. French 1853-1923. oil/canvas.
http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

a rare reversal of the nude lady hangin’ out around fully clothed dudes?
1912 beefcakes? I guess?

This IS a nice change.  Hubba hubba.

beatonna:

hadrian6:

Hercules at the Feet of Omphale. 1912. Gustave Claude Etienne Courtois. French 1853-1923. oil/canvas.

http://hadrian6.tumblr.com

a rare reversal of the nude lady hangin’ out around fully clothed dudes?

1912 beefcakes? I guess?

This IS a nice change.  Hubba hubba.

beatonna:

Here is the last part of the short story Ducks
You can get to the other four parts here
On Monday, I’ll post them all together so they can be easily shared as a whole thing, but here is the end for those who have been reading for now.

God damn it, Kate, this whole thing is amazing and made me cry.  I love your work.

beatonna:

Here is the last part of the short story Ducks

You can get to the other four parts here

On Monday, I’ll post them all together so they can be easily shared as a whole thing, but here is the end for those who have been reading for now.

God damn it, Kate, this whole thing is amazing and made me cry.  I love your work.

peashooter85:

Food From Heaven —- Operation Manna

 The Netherlands, World War II

In September of 1944, British Gen. Bernard Montgomery devised an audacious plan to liberate Belgium and The Netherlands, then cross the Rhine River, invading Germany and ending the war before Christmas.  The people of the Netherlands rejoiced as Allied soldiers liberated their towns and cities, which had suffered under German occupation for over four years.  People celebrated in the streets and waved Dutch flags.  The Dutch resistance struck back at the German Army and executed those who collaborated with the enemy. Alas the liberation of the Netherlands was not to be.  Montgomery’s plan to capture a number a key strategic bridges proved to be too audacious.  The invasion failed miserably and the Allies were forced to retreat.

As a punishment for the Dutch rebellion during the Allied invasion, German occupying forces severely restricted food and fuel supplies coming into the Netherlands.  What resulted was a famine called “The Hunger Winter”.  By Christmas of 1944, food rations were down to 1,000 calories per person a day.  As the war wound to a close the Third Reich began to collapse as the Western Allies and the Soviet Union closed in on Berlin. By April of 1945 the Soviets were storming Berlin, and the Allies had occupied much of Western and Southern Germany.  However the Netherlands still remained under German control.  A country with a series of rivers and natural obstacles, German occupation forces heavily fortified the country.  As a result, the Allies chosen to invade Germany from the south, bypassing the Netherlands altogether.  This was most unfortunate for the Dutch people, as daily rations had dropped to around 500 calories a day by the end of April 1945.

As the famine became critical British High Command devised a plan to help relieve the suffering in the Netherlands.  A massive airlift of food was organized, called Operation Manna, named after the biblical food from God which saved the starving Israelites in the desert.   Starting April 29th, 3,156 Lancaster Bombers from the British Royal Air Force and the Royal Australian Air Force were marshaled for the airlift.  Flying no higher than 100 meters, the bombers dropped thousands of pounds of food in drop zones all over the Netherlands. The food was dropped from low altitudes without parachutes.  The purpose of this was to avoid attention from the Germans, who would certainly notice parachutes in the sky. Between April 29th and May 8th the British and Australian Air Force had managed to fly 3,298 sorties, delivering over 11,000 tons of food to the Dutch people.  Only three bombers were lost in the airlift.

The success of Operation Manna inspired other operations as well.  On May 1st, the US Army Air Force began Operation Chowhound, which was a similar operation which resulted in the airlifting of an additional 4,000 tons of food.  In an especially bold maneuver called Operation Faust, 200 US Army trucks drove behind enemy lines and delivered food to the city of Renan.

On May 4th German forces occupying the Netherlands surrendered.  Regardless the operation continued until May 8th, when regular supply convoys could enter the Netherlands and when Germany signed its final unconditional surrender.  Despite the airlift, between 20,000 and 30,000 Dutch people starved to death.

For my mother, who lived this experience. 

Let’s take a moment for this WW2 American Corsair crewman’s exceptional legs.  The only way this would be better is if he were also smoking a pipe.  
What?  Am I wrong?

Let’s take a moment for this WW2 American Corsair crewman’s exceptional legs.  The only way this would be better is if he were also smoking a pipe. 

What?  Am I wrong?

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Early Winter Snowstorm
Photography by Scott Berdahl (Whitehorse, Canada); Yukon Territory, Canada

smithsonianmag:

Photo of the Day: Early Winter Snowstorm

Photography by Scott Berdahl (Whitehorse, Canada); Yukon Territory, Canada

operationbarbarossa:

A paratrooper of the 82nd Airborne Division; Saint-Sauveur-Le-Vicomte, France - 16 June 1944
Photo by Robert Capa

In chaos, we take what moments of peace we can.

operationbarbarossa:

A paratrooper of the 82nd Airborne Division; Saint-Sauveur-Le-Vicomte, France - 16 June 1944

Photo by Robert Capa

In chaos, we take what moments of peace we can.

iowawomensarchives:

Collect them all!!

In 1978, Lois Rich was asked by her 8-year-old daughter, a baseball card collector, why there weren’t any pictures of girls on the cards. By the following year, Rich had sought out and received grant funding from educational organizations to create the Supersisters trading card set, featuring 72 feminist heroines [source]. With subjects ranging from puppeteer Shari Lewis to politician and future IWA co-founder Mary Louise Smith, the cards have been dismissed by some modern-day pundits as a “noble but misguided” project (“It’s sort of hard to imagine kids getting excited about them — ‘Hey, I’ll trade you two Bella Abzugs for a mint Shirley Chisolm!’”). However, I find them a fascinating artifact documenting the areas in which women were — and weren’t — making progress during the second wave of feminism. 

 former IWA assistant and current archivist supersister Sarah Dorpinghaus

Iowa Digital Library: Supersisters trading cards, 1979

Iowa Women’s Archives: Guide to the Mary Louise Smith papers, 1925-1997

View all Women’s History Wednesday posts

This is a fascinating bit of history, on many levels.  Check out the Supersisters !

bookshelfporn:

Veronica’s One-of-a-Kind Mandala Bookshelf